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04

Mar

latimes:

Twitter is not the world: Or America, for that matter. In a new study from Pew Research, reactions to events on Twitter often are detached from society’s reactions as a whole. While Pew found that Twitter consensus moves back and forth from liberal to conservative, what really sticks out is just how much more negative Twitter discussions can be.

For both [presidential] candidates, negative comments exceeded positive comments by a wide margin throughout the fall campaign season. But from September through November, Romney was consistently the target of more negative reactions than was Obama.

And as always, it’s important to understand the limitations of Twitter’s reach.

The overall reach of Twitter is modest. In the Pew Research Center’s 2012 biennial news consumption survey, just 13% of adults said they ever use Twitter or read Twitter messages; only 3% said they regularly or sometimes tweet or retweet news or news headlines on Twitter.

Read Pew’s full study here (or follow them on Tumblr, which will hopefully be proven to be more positive than Twitter).
Photo: Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP

latimes:

Twitter is not the world: Or America, for that matter. In a new study from Pew Research, reactions to events on Twitter often are detached from society’s reactions as a whole. While Pew found that Twitter consensus moves back and forth from liberal to conservative, what really sticks out is just how much more negative Twitter discussions can be.

For both [presidential] candidates, negative comments exceeded positive comments by a wide margin throughout the fall campaign season. But from September through November, Romney was consistently the target of more negative reactions than was Obama.

And as always, it’s important to understand the limitations of Twitter’s reach.

The overall reach of Twitter is modest. In the Pew Research Center’s 2012 biennial news consumption survey, just 13% of adults said they ever use Twitter or read Twitter messages; only 3% said they regularly or sometimes tweet or retweet news or news headlines on Twitter.

Read Pew’s full study here (or follow them on Tumblr, which will hopefully be proven to be more positive than Twitter).

Photo: Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP

25

Feb

Ten years ago, this could have been done and no one would have figured out about it. Social media makes work easier to steal—but it also makes the people who take it more accountable.

When DKNY mistakenly used some of Brandon Stanton’s (a.k.a. Humans of New York) photographs in a store display in Bangkok without his permission, Stanton found out thanks to a fan. Stanton asked for the company to donate $100,000 to the YMCA in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn. The company has apologized and agreed to give $25,000. 

Read the full story. (Also, follow Humans of New York.)

08

Feb

fastcompany:

Trying to make it big on social media? Want more followers? Here are10 Tips From Boing Boing On Making Online Content Sing
At the dawn of blogging in 1995, Mark Frauenfelder moved his ‘zine Boing Boing online. Boing Boing—whose mission was to explore “the coolest, wackiest stuff”—became and remains one of the Internet’s most popular blogs.

“The recipe for an excellent blog is to be so deeply obsessed with something that you need to communicate it to others,” says Frauenfelder. “If BoingBoing stopped making money tomorrow, I’d still need to do it.”

Excerpted from The Art of Doing: How Superachievers Do What They Do and How They Do It so Well, here are Frauenfelder’s 10 tips for building a addictive, compelling website—and a big following: 
1. Tap into the Zeitgeist.

If you can tap into the right cultural moment you’ll have a lot of fans.

2. Be original.

If you try to emulate a successful blog, you’ll just be a second-rate version of something already out there, and who needs that? 

3. Make the connection.

Instead of obsessing on digital marketing the mission of the blog should be to share information with like-minded people.

4. Get an attitude. 

Without a point of view, your blog is unfiltered mush. Whether you love or hate a blog, you still want it to have a unique perspective.

5. Don’t waste people’s time.

If you’ve developed a trust with your readers that they’ll get good value for the time they invest in visiting your site, they’ll be back.

6. Mix it up. 

You have to have an editor’s gut feeling to get the mix right. We’re as likely to have a post about a chilling political development as something on the frothiest bit of pop culture.

7. Appeal to the novelty gene.

They say that there is a novelty-seeking gene. It causes people (like me!) to crave excitement, and to want constant hits of surprising things that don’t fit the conventional model of the way the world works. 

8. Let feedback change you.

The community feedback has made me more aware of my insensitivities and the blog has evolved because of it.

9. Think of a friend. 

So to get over blog stage fright, when I post something I’ll often have a friend in mind who has the same sense of humor as me. 

10. Keep it real.

People love to hear about real life, as if they’re sitting there with you, experiencing it.

What other tips do you have? What makes your blog special?

fastcompany:

Trying to make it big on social media? Want more followers? Here are10 Tips From Boing Boing On Making Online Content Sing

At the dawn of blogging in 1995, Mark Frauenfelder moved his ‘zine Boing Boing online. Boing Boing—whose mission was to explore “the coolest, wackiest stuff”—became and remains one of the Internet’s most popular blogs.

“The recipe for an excellent blog is to be so deeply obsessed with something that you need to communicate it to others,” says Frauenfelder. “If BoingBoing stopped making money tomorrow, I’d still need to do it.”

Excerpted from The Art of Doing: How Superachievers Do What They Do and How They Do It so Well, here are Frauenfelder’s 10 tips for building a addictive, compelling website—and a big following: 

1. Tap into the Zeitgeist.

If you can tap into the right cultural moment you’ll have a lot of fans.

2. Be original.

If you try to emulate a successful blog, you’ll just be a second-rate version of something already out there, and who needs that? 

3. Make the connection.

Instead of obsessing on digital marketing the mission of the blog should be to share information with like-minded people.

4. Get an attitude. 

Without a point of view, your blog is unfiltered mush. Whether you love or hate a blog, you still want it to have a unique perspective.

5. Don’t waste people’s time.

If you’ve developed a trust with your readers that they’ll get good value for the time they invest in visiting your site, they’ll be back.

6. Mix it up. 

You have to have an editor’s gut feeling to get the mix right. We’re as likely to have a post about a chilling political development as something on the frothiest bit of pop culture.

7. Appeal to the novelty gene.

They say that there is a novelty-seeking gene. It causes people (like me!) to crave excitement, and to want constant hits of surprising things that don’t fit the conventional model of the way the world works. 

8. Let feedback change you.

The community feedback has made me more aware of my insensitivities and the blog has evolved because of it.

9. Think of a friend. 

So to get over blog stage fright, when I post something I’ll often have a friend in mind who has the same sense of humor as me. 

10. Keep it real.

People love to hear about real life, as if they’re sitting there with you, experiencing it.

What other tips do you have? What makes your blog special?

03

Feb

kateoplis:

The End of the Web, Search, and Computer as We Know It | Wired

People ask what the next web will be like, but there won’t be a next web.
The space-based web we currently have will gradually be replaced by a time-based worldstream. It’s already happening, and it all began with the lifestream, a phenomenon that I (with Eric Freeman) predicted in the 1990s and shared in the pages of Wired almost exactly 16 years ago.
This lifestream — a heterogeneous, content-searchable, real-time messaging stream — arrived in the form of blog posts and RSS feeds, Twitter and other chatstreams, and Facebook walls and timelines. Its structure represented a shift beyond the “flatland known as the desktop” (where our interfaces ignored the temporal dimension) towards streams, which flow and can therefore serve as a concrete representation of time.
It’s a bit like moving from a desktop to a magic diary: Picture a diary whose pages turn automatically, tracking your life moment to moment … Until you touch it, and then, the page-turning stops. The diary becomes a sort of reference book: a complete and searchable guide to your life. Put it down, and the pages start turning again.
Today, this diary-like structure is supplanting the spatial one as the dominant paradigm of the cybersphere: All the information on the internet will soon be a time-based structure. In the world of bits, space-based structures are static. Time-based structures are dynamic, always flowing — like time itself.
The web will be history.

kateoplis:

The End of the Web, Search, and Computer as We Know It | Wired

People ask what the next web will be like, but there won’t be a next web.

The space-based web we currently have will gradually be replaced by a time-based worldstream. It’s already happening, and it all began with the lifestream, a phenomenon that I (with Eric Freeman) predicted in the 1990s and shared in the pages of Wired almost exactly 16 years ago.

This lifestream — a heterogeneous, content-searchable, real-time messaging stream — arrived in the form of blog posts and RSS feeds, Twitter and other chatstreams, and Facebook walls and timelines. Its structure represented a shift beyond the “flatland known as the desktop” (where our interfaces ignored the temporal dimension) towards streams, which flow and can therefore serve as a concrete representation of time.

It’s a bit like moving from a desktop to a magic diary: Picture a diary whose pages turn automatically, tracking your life moment to moment … Until you touch it, and then, the page-turning stops. The diary becomes a sort of reference book: a complete and searchable guide to your life. Put it down, and the pages start turning again.

Today, this diary-like structure is supplanting the spatial one as the dominant paradigm of the cybersphere: All the information on the internet will soon be a time-based structure. In the world of bits, space-based structures are static. Time-based structures are dynamic, always flowing — like time itself.

The web will be history.

24

Jun

We report for our readers and listeners, not our sources. So our primary consideration when presenting the news is that we are fair to the truth. If our sources try to mislead us or put a false spin on the information they give us, we tell our audience. If the balance of evidence in a matter of controversy weighs heavily on one side, we acknowledge it in our reports. We strive to give our audience confidence that all sides have been considered and represented fairly.
NPR ethics handbook, Fairness in presenting the news (via copyeditor)

13

Jun

A good curator is thinking not just about acquisition and selection, but also contextualizing.

09

Jun

Journalists used to be powerful. But now there are so many 25-year-old bloggers, many of them showing up on the TV talk shows, that the old-timers are struggling to catch up, tweeting their hearts out and using hip language like ‘hashtags.’
Sally Quinn on the end of power in Washington. (via peterfeld)
youneededaneditor:

Wow, DirecTV, we don’t know if we’d describe a brother and sister romancing each other as “good clean fun” (or even “good, clean fun”), but, then again… Oh? Ah! You meant that “a brother and sister each find romance…” Gotcha.
No big deal, although we imagine the incest pervs might have been disappointed once they watched this through to the end.

youneededaneditor:

Wow, DirecTV, we don’t know if we’d describe a brother and sister romancing each other as “good clean fun” (or even “good, clean fun”), but, then again… Oh? Ah! You meant that “a brother and sister each find romance…” Gotcha.

No big deal, although we imagine the incest pervs might have been disappointed once they watched this through to the end.

youneededaneditor:

We’re sad that we didn’t take a screen grab of this before all the commenters on Facebook pointed out to Think Progress that the article talked about “North Dakota,” but the FB caption and FB headline said “North Carolina.”
Easy mistake. They’re exactly the same and almost in the same place.

youneededaneditor:

We’re sad that we didn’t take a screen grab of this before all the commenters on Facebook pointed out to Think Progress that the article talked about “North Dakota,” but the FB caption and FB headline said “North Carolina.”

Easy mistake. They’re exactly the same and almost in the same place.

15

May

futurejournalismproject:

The New Renaissance Journalism Website
If you’re not already familiar, Renaissance Journalism, a program of San Francisco State University’s Department of Journalism, is a great resource on the future of news (especially for those in the Bay Area). Also see their new media toolkit for curated tools and tutorials. Some new features include:

What’s New?
A new blog called “Media Matters” by Jon Funabiki, Renaissance Journalism’s executive director, who weaves together insights from a career that spans journalism, philanthropy and academia.
Bay Area Ethnic & Community Media Map: Based on a 2011 Renaissance Journalism survey, we’ve charted the more than 140 ethnic and community media organizations in the Bay Area. You can narrow down your search by primary language or search by a news outlet’s name.
Resources page, where we’ll be posting studies, research and writings on media innovations—from Renaissance Journalism and other journalism and media organizations—as well as links to many of our partners’ and collaborators’ websites.

futurejournalismproject:

The New Renaissance Journalism Website

If you’re not already familiar, Renaissance Journalism, a program of San Francisco State University’s Department of Journalism, is a great resource on the future of news (especially for those in the Bay Area). Also see their new media toolkit for curated tools and tutorials. Some new features include:

What’s New?

  • A new blog called “Media Matters” by Jon Funabiki, Renaissance Journalism’s executive director, who weaves together insights from a career that spans journalism, philanthropy and academia.
  • Bay Area Ethnic & Community Media Map: Based on a 2011 Renaissance Journalism survey, we’ve charted the more than 140 ethnic and community media organizations in the Bay Area. You can narrow down your search by primary language or search by a news outlet’s name.
  • Resources page, where we’ll be posting studies, research and writings on media innovations—from Renaissance Journalism and other journalism and media organizations—as well as links to many of our partners’ and collaborators’ websites.